We Love Category


Happy Yorkshire Day!

Happy Yorkshire Day one and all!

While its status may not afford a bank holiday or a Google Doodle, we at Build cannot pass 1 August without officially celebrating God's Own County.
So for one day only, we are offering 20% off the following (by)Build Shop products, as selected by proud Yorkshire-man Michael C. Place—

The Sun - Scale Series
The Sun - Scale Series.
'Because the Sun always shines on Yorkshire! And us Yorkshire folk are renowned for having a sunny outlook on life!'

Modern Life Is Rubbish - Mangle
Modern Life Is Rubbish - Train
Modern Life Is Rubbish Series.
'Because by 'eck it used to be all fields round here (to be fair it still is!), and we can be a contradictory bunch (see above)'

YES
YES—
'Because we are a positive bunch, but also we can be a little black and white about things'.

MONO
Mono exhibition poster.
'Like my mum's Yorkshire puddings, it will always be number one in my book!'

WALT
HARVEY
DICK
Walt, Dick & Harvey.
'Always smiling (even when getting a round in), and especially when talking about Yorkshire'.

FELLOWSHIP IS LIFE T-SHIRT
Fellowship is Life.
'Because we always stick together!'

***This offer has now ended— Here's to Yorkshire Day 2014!***

Simply add the discount code YORKSHIRE at the checkout for 20% off any of the items above. The discount will be valid until tomorrow (Friday 2nd August). Happy shopping everyone!
bybuildshop.com

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Getting to know (#012)…Adrian Shaughnessy.


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Twelfth in the series of interviews with people we know, have worked with, or are inspiring.
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I like to think of Adrian as the John Peel of the design world, knowledgable and hugely respected by his peers.
Adrian is one of the most generous men in design. I first met Adrian when (the now defunct) Grafik magazine asked us to be profiled in their magazine. Adrian was to write the article (2004), he got in touch and set up an interview at his home. I was very nervous as I'd read a lot about Adrian, all very good but nonetheless I was nervous. The interview went well, we were really pleased with the final piece. The opening line still makes me laugh to this day "He's a big guy. If you put him in a dinner jacket he could be a nightclub bouncer..."
A few years passed and our paths crossed again, Adrian was working with a small team of people called 'This Is Real Art'. They had a small roster of creatives from various fields who they worked with on various commercial projects and I was asked to be one of them. We worked together on quite a few projects together, including what has to be one of the shortest pitch presentations in the history of pitches (ask him about it if you ever meet him!).
Adrian now divides his time between Unit Editions, the RCA and his myriad of speaking engagements, he's a busy man. He most recently wrote the beautiful forward to our 11 year show, and it's no secret we love him here at Build. He has helped us over a lot over the years. When things haven't been going that great, his advice has been invaluable, and for that we will always be grateful. Whatever Adrian does, he does it with passion, we will always support him, as he has supported us.
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*Sampler2
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*How to be a graphic designer without losing your soul
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*Unit Editions - Studio Culture
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*Unit Editions - Lubalin
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*Mute - Audio Documents
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Getting to know (#012) — Adrian Shaughnessy
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Build: Please tell us a little about who you are and what you do.
Adrian Shaughnessy: Well, I'm a person who worries a lot. I'm driven by fear of failure. I wake up worried and go to sleep worried. Everything I do is driven by a nagging doubt that I'm a rotten failure. Otherwise, I'm a normal person who designs, writes, lectures, teaches, publishes and listens to lots of music and watches too many films.
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B: How did you get to this point in time?
AS: Through worry, fear and self-doubt.
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B: Where are you based?
AS: In my head most of the time. But also in my studio at home, at the Unit Editions office, and at the RCA. Each gives me something different that I really value. Home is privacy; Unit is working in a tiny group of like-minded people; and RCA is a big tumultuous scrum of different ideas, a huge spectrum of different people and attitudes, and intellectual gymnastics.
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B: Does where you live/work inform you as a person?
AS: Yes. For years I went to a studio every day. I loved studio life - the camaraderie, the clients, the highs and the lows. But after a while I fell out of love with the communality of studio life. One of the things that I value most in life is privacy. And you don't get that when you run a studio. So now, I have a better balance of privacy and communality.
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B: What is your favourite piece of your own work and why is it your favourite?
AS: For me, it's always the next job. I've never done anything that I think can't be done be better.
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B: Three words that sum up you and your attitude to what you do?
AS: Looking, looking, looking.
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B: Describe your style?
AS: Haphazard.
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B: What kind of music do you listen to?
AS: I like to think I have really broad taste. I like everything from extreme avant garde electronics to Elvis. From movie soundtracks to Appalachian fiddle music; from John Coltrane to Peggy Lee; from Shackleton to Brian Wilson. I have hundreds of CDs and vinyl LPS. I have more MP3 files that I could ever listen to if I lived to be 150. I love music.
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B: What is your most played track in iTunes?
AS: At the moment it's a Laurel Halo track from her new album Quarantine. But some Morricone tracks are pretty close behind.
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B: What is your favourite piece of art?
AS: Anything by Josef Beuys.
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B: Where were you last happiest?
AS: When I was three.
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B: What makes you smile?
AS: Thinking about being three again.
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B: Your house is on fire, your family is safe, what do you save?
AS: This is really depressing, but I would save my computers. How did we get to the point where these funny 'adding machines' are the most important things in our lives? There is a theory around this - it's called The Singularity. It is the moment when the machines take over. In my view, it's here. We are now living in The Singularity. Weird. But wait, I'd also save my bike! I cant imagine living without my bike. Don't care about my car - but I'd save my bike. Oh, and I have some signed Josef Beuys prints - I'd save them too. And some books. On second thoughts, sod the computers. Let them burn.

Thanks Adrian!


Note(s)/Link(s)
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Unit Editions / RCA / Elvis / Appalachian fiddle music / John Coltrane / Peggy Lee / Shackleton / Brian Wilson / Laurel Halo / Morricone / Josef Beuys.

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Getting to know (#011)…Mr Bingo™


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Eleventh in the series of interviews with people we know, have worked with, or are inspiring.
I'm sure you've all heard of our next interviewee, he's the King of self-promotion, the man born in a small childs body, Mr Potty-mouth, the master of pens, the one, the only (thank f**k) Mr Bingo™
Mr Bingo™, the Batman of the illustration world once chastised Nicky for calling him by his real name ("Don't EVER call me that in public again"). I met Mr Bingo™ (one of the SBCs) through another friend James 'Gradiate' Greenfield quite a few years ago and has been a friend ever since. He's a very talented individual with a wicked sense of humour, and I think that's his main USP, the way he looks at the world.
He came up with the genius idea of 'Hate Mail©', as the man himself explains it "You send me twenty quid (plus postage) and I'll send you a vintage postcard with a little drawing and an offensive message on it. (that's why it's called 'Hate mail'). So you get an original signed drawing, the postman get's a laugh and the world get's a little bit happier". The project was so successful that he was inundated with requests and the project has now been made into a book 'Hate Mail©' (published by Penguin Books). As Mr Bingo™ himself says, it's a great downstairs toilet book, buy it, you won't regret it (and perhaps he'll stop spamming everywhere if you do).

**UPDATE** Mr Bingo™'s brand team have been in touch and pointed out that the only reason he did this interview was so he could plug his book. And as outlined in our agreement, pages 3, 5, 9 & 11 state "A link should clearly be displayed pointing to the Amazon page of his book, failure to do so will end in legal procedure by Mr Bingo™'s legal team".
So here is that link — BUY Mr Bingo™ - HATE MAIL BOOK HERE.
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*Hate Mail© book cover
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*Hate Mail© spread
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*Hate Mail© spread
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*Hate Mail© posting
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*Hate Mail© posting
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*Hate Ale©
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Getting to know (#011) — Mr Bingo™
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Build: Please tell us a little about who you are and what you do.
Mr Bingo™: My name is Mr Bingo and I'm meant to be an illustrator.
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B: How did you get to this point in time?
MB: Through a series of mistakes, accidents, decisions (right and wrong ones), a bit of luck and trying hard.
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B: Where are you based?
MB: I live in Victoria Park (London) and I work from a studio in Dalston (London).
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B: Does where you live/work inform you as a person?
MB: If my work includes ironically facial haired middle class hipsters discussing their latest coffee app in a pop up burlesque burger bar, then yes.
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B: What is your favourite piece of your own work and why is it your favourite?
MB: It's a postcard I sent to someone which has a drawing on it of an overweight boy looking at a book and it says 'GIVE UP YOUR UNREALISTIC DREAMS'.
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B: Three words that sum up you and your attitude to what you do?
MB: MASTER OF PENS.
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B: Describe your style?
MB: I would say my work has more of a feeling than a look.
I'd want that feeling to be a funny feeling.
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B: What kind of music do you listen to?
MB: http://studiomusic.fm/_bingo.html
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B: What is your most played track in iTunes?
MB: The Strokes - Machu Picchu.
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B: What is your favourite piece of art?
MB: A drawing my girlfriend did of me, drinking a Capri Sun.
(http://instagram.com/p/RxHY8kPCkP/)
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B: Where were you last happiest?
MB: 1986. I completed the Panini Mexico 86 World Cup sticker album.
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B: What makes you smile?
MB: Animals, humans, sky, nature, buildings, conversations, youtube clips, art, new socks, food, nudists, colours.
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B: Your house is on fire, your family is safe, what do you save?
MB: A plastic A4 wallet containing a collection of my childhood drawings.

Thanks Mr Bingo™*

*Mr Bingo™ is a registered trademark of Mr Bingo™

Note(s)/Link(s)
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Mr Bingo™ / Hate Mail© / Dalston (London) / The Strokes - Machu Picchu / Panini Mexico 86 World Cup sticker album.

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Getting to know (#010)…Patrick Burgoyne.


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Tenth in the series of interviews with people we know, have worked with, or are inspiring.
Creative Review has pretty much been a constant in the life of most creatives. The challenges a magazine faces today are very different from 1980 (when CR launched), the rise of the internet has taken its toll on the publishing industry, magazines fold, Design Week print edition a recent casualty. I think Creative Review have taken on those challenges particularly well, the launch of the CR Blog, and its iPad version hopefully means it stays relevant in the fast-moving digital world it documents. A quick look at Patrick's LinkedIn profile states that he has been at Creative Review for 13 years and 6 months. Patrick started in June 1999, I was still at tDR in 1999 and I think our paths may have crossed briefly then. In 2007 Patrick got in touch to see if we would take part in an experiment, he asked us if we would record a month of studio life for the magazine. 'A month in the life of a graphic designer' was its title. Patrick also kindly agreed to be filmed for a piece on illustration we did for Nokia. We often bump into Patrick at various design events, he's a really nice man, engaging, I think he's steered the CR ship in some really interesting areas. I hope he continues to be the editor for many more years.
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*CR office
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*CR-Logo issue
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*CR-A month in the life of a graphic designer
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Getting to know (#010) — Patrick Burgoyne.
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Build: Please tell us a little about who you are and what you do.
Patrick Burgoyne: I'm Patrick Burgoyne and I am editor of Creative Review, which was once a magazine for the world of visual communications, but is now a magazine, website, iPad App, Twitter feed, Facebook page, events organiser, awards show etc etc.
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B: How did you get to this point in time?
PB: Given the massive upheaval that has taken place in the media world in the last ten years, you could say I was in the right place at the wrong time. It's exciting and fun but life was so much simpler when all we had to worry about was print.
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B: Where are you based?
PB: Corner of Oxford Street and Wells St, London W1, fourth floor, overlooking a building site that has been the cause of endless fascination for all the CR staff for the last six months as the old building was demolished floor by floor and the site gradually cleared. About three times a day someone says that we should have set up a camera to record it all as a stop motion film. But we didn't.
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B: Does where you live/work inform you as a person?
PB: Inevitably, but less so now the internet provides access to the whole world.
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B: What is your favourite piece of your own work and why is it your favourite?
PB: Probably the best issue of CR we have done was the Logos issue from April 2011 which gave us the chance to delve into a fascinating subject in real depth and was very satisfying to work on. Other than that, I'd have to say the website which, despite its faults, has given us something that a lot of other magazines have failed to maintain post-internet - relevance. Current favourite - the iPad app, with which we're trying to break from the typical way in which magazines do these things.
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B: Three words that sum up you and your attitude to what you do?
PB: Keep trying things.
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B: Describe your style?
PB: Clichéd urbanite getting it slightly wrong.
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B: What kind of music do you listen to?
PB: Whatever my son puts on the car stereo as he guards it with obsessive zeal.
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B: What is your most played track in iTunes?
PB: I don't know how to find that out - crap isn't it? My iPod contains all manner of guilty secrets from my 80s adolescence so it's probably something involving either wedge hair cuts and synthesisers or denim jackets and patches.
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B: What is your favourite piece of art?
PB: I was just sent the most beautiful book of photographs - Gotham City by Luca Campigotto - so that's a current favourite. I received it the week Superstorm Sandy hit so its incredibly, almost too perfect shots of NY at night make a spectacular contrast with the current state of the city. If you love New York, or perhaps I should say the idea of New York, this is the book for you.
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B: Where were you last happiest?
PB: At my friends' house on Saturday night as we attempted to keep a bonfire alight.
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B: What makes you smile?
PB: Probably the most surprising thing recently was a Shakespearean comedy we went to at half-term (we were in Stratford, it seemed the thing to do). Who knew they could actually be funny?
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B: Your house is on fire, your family is safe, what do you save?
PB: Nothing. Claim on the insurance and start again.

Thanks Patrick!

Note(s)/Link(s)
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Creative Review / CR Blog / Gotham City by Luca Campigotto.

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Getting to know (#009)…Veronica Lethorn.


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Ninth in the series of interviews with people we know, have worked with, or are inspiring.
We were looking for a good freelance designer to help us out on a big project, Veronica was recommended to us by both Ben Stott & David Bennett/OPX. She came in to show her portfolio, it took a few minutes to tune into the Glaswegian accent and she started the following week. Apart from Veronica's (questionable) music taste she fit right in, i've never heard so many people say 'pardon?' when speaking to someone though. The project turned into quite a stressful one, but we got through it with a good end result. She's very hard working, and a good laugh. Joe got a new nickname, and I think we managed to get her into a little electronic music, we also got some lovely home-cooked food, and we look forward to working with Veronica in the future... we might even let you play some of your music next time!
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Some of Veronica's work—
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*Glasgow City Halls
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*Sindüstry
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*Rolling Stones 'Exile On Main Street' Ltd edition
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*Topshop - One New Change
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*Harper MacLeod
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Getting to know (#009) — Veronica Lethorn.
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Build: Please tell us a little about who you are and what you do.
Veronica Lethorn: I'm Veronica Lethorn, a freelance graphic designer. Currently working in London and am known amongst friends for having more than a few opinions.
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B: How did you get to this point in time?
VL: Hard work, being in the right place at the right time (at some points), passion, and doing what I believe in, in the areas of Dundee, Glasgow and London… so far.
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B: Where are you based?
VL: East London (I'm wincing as I am a London graphic design cliché).
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B: Does where you live/work inform you as a person?
VL: Definitely. Your geographical surroundings and people you surround yourself with influence your ideals ambitions and personality for sure, but there is also something to be said for challenging yourself and experiencing things that seem daunting and scary.
Your base/where you live is so important, the objects you acquire the home you make, the places you venture to when you have free time and the friends you keep. I'm fortunate enough to be surrounded by some amazing friends and have worked alongside peers that I have had massive respect for, it's been a bumpy ride along the way but it's important to surround yourself with people who make you laugh, challenge you, inform you and tell you your wrong when you think your right.
I'm from Glasgow originally its known for being cold, wet, friendly, a music hub, a fried food capital and for its no nonsense attitude. I can't and don't want to get away from its values because its made me who I am as an individual. I'd like yo think I've lost a bit of the hard nosed Glasgow in me, but not too much, it comes in handy at times being able to 'handle yourself'. When I first visited London at 18, I remember walking and looking around all the time taking it all in, there's something to take inspiration from in many nooks and crannies in London,that's why I like it so much. It's so big and energetic, I still get inspired by it on a daily basis 4 years on. It's very different to Glasgow but it's funny I chose to live in an area that's a bit on the raw side because it reminds me of home.
Where you work definitely informs you to a certain extent, this is a bit of a strange question for me as I move around a lot. Working in different studios of big and small teams, seeing how each machine is run, finding out the many different ways of approaching projects of large and small scales. I have taken a lot from the many places I have worked so far, it's important to take what you can from each experience you have, offering what you can of your skills as well as sponging the knowledge you can get from the others around you to inform, inspire and challenge you to make you into a better designer.
But it's also worth remembering where you want to go and what you want to do along the way, to remember exactly why and how you got to where you are now and where you want to go from there. That's what sets the tone for what direction you head to next.
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B: What is your favourite piece of your own work and why is it your favourite?
VL: This is a tough one... The PlusPlus project I worked on with Build was by far the most fun and a challenge. It's up there as a favourite because it was a change for me, I am primarily a print and branding designer so it was nice to have a change and I learned a lot on that project, which is always great. It was playful and surreal, I've always been interested in Russian constructivism its one of my favourite periods in design as I love Alexander Rodchenko and the principles of the movement, it was interesting because we took the aesthetic and tried to inject a personality into it. It was also a great experience because the people and environment I was working in was special, it makes a huge difference working in a well considered environment with people who are insanely passionate, innate, compulsive and dedicated.
However working on a book for one of the greatest rock and roll albums of all time, and also one of my favorite bands that I have been brought up on 'The Rolling Stones' was also a dream project. I don't know if I can really decide between the two. They are both favourites for different reasons.
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B: Three words that sum up you and your attitude to what you do?
VL: Honest, bold and inquisitive.
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B: Describe your style?
VL: I am told that we as designers are not supposed to have one, but I guess I'm a modernist and a minimalist at heart.
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B: What kind of music do you listen to?
VL: Shoe gaze, psychedelic and garage rock, indie, punk, rock and roll and recently after a bit of apprehension I have dipped my toe in the luke warm pool of electronic.
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B: What is your most played track in iTunes?
VL: Im surprised by this to be honest, but not. Its The Kills, No Wow. I expected it to be a New Order, Doors or Smiths track.
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B: What is your favourite piece of art?
VL: Guernica by Picasso. I seen it at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid last year and didn't quite realize the scale of it until I stood there looking at it for a long time.
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B: Where were you last happiest?
VL: In the sunshine on a boat in Croatia, listening to Bob Marley, eating my body weight in seafood and red wine.
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B: What makes you smile?
VL: The unexpected.
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B: Your house is on fire, your family is safe, what do you save?
VL: Books or my printed samples, sad but true… print is not dead for me.

Thanks Veronica!

Note(s)/Link(s)
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Glasgow / PlusPlus / Russian Constructivism / Alexander Rodchenko / The Rolling Stones / Shoe gaze / The Kills, No Wow / Guernica by Picasso / Museo Reina / Croatia / Bob Marley.

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Getting to know (#008)…Nick Bax.


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Eigth in the series of interviews with people we know/have worked with/are inspiring.
I worked with Nick for about 9 years at The Designers Republic, during that time we shared some fairly amazing times (and some not so great). We worked on some amazing projects, shaped the face of electronic music and had a good laugh whilst doing it. Many good nights spent over at The Rutland (pint of laughing brew), many dinners shared at Eric's and plenty of Hot & Sour soup at Candytown. I was also one of a select few left mentally scarred by Nick's stag do, a night I will never forget. I left the Designers Republic, Nick stayed and went on to be (I think) the longest standing member (apart from Ian). Nick finally left, much to my surprise as I always envisaged Nick working there until he retired, gold disc in hand...
Nick finally left tDR and set up Human in 2007, still in Sheffield, the Steel City, where men are men and men call you 'love'. And that's where Nick is today, head down, with a bigger team, doing good work. Eating pies (Pret is for Southerners), drinking ale, and chuckling to himself, always chuckling...
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Some of Nick's/Human's work—
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*Human studio (team photo)
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*Fitriani
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*Dubfire show visuals
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*Sheffield Student's Union
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*Music For Real Airports
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Getting to know (#008) — Nick Bax.
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Build: Please tell us a little about who you are and what you do.
Nick Bax: I'm the founder and creative director of Humanstudio, also known as Human. As no-one seems to know what a 'creative director' is, I usually say I'm a 'designer' which is a bit unspecific and could mean someone who designs clothes, cars or condoms.
I trained as a graphic designer but I don't think that 'graphic design' describes or captures what I do any more.
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B: How did you get to this point in time?
NB: My family lived in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, until I was 9 and then moved to Maltby, a mining village in South Yorkshire. When I was 12 my art teacher asked me: "Do you know what a graphic designer is?" I said "no" and he replied "I think you should find out".
After leaving school, I studied Art & Design at Rotherham College and then Graphic Design at Colchester Institute. While I was studying I had 2 work placements at The Designers Republic (TDR) and officially joined TDR just 3 days after I finished my course in 1990. No gap year for me :-)
In early 1992 I was recruited by Mainartery, a London-based music-industry design company, but found myself being drawn back to Sheffield and TDR in summer 1993. After 14 amazing years I left TDR in 2007 and launched Humanstudio.
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B: Where are you based?
NB: Sheffield, South Yorkshire. Apart from my 18-month 'sabbatical' in London, I've lived in Sheffield my entire working life. 22 years and counting...
Our studio is based in Globe Works, a Grade II* listed building which was completed in 1825 and is credited as being the first purpose-built cutlery factory in the world. Very soon we're moving to another amazing historic Grade II* listed building...
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B: Does where you live/work inform you as a person?
NB: Yes, I think it defines part of who you are. It's like an accent - you can try and escape it but it's an integral part of your character. The location and interior of a studio has the same effect on design teams - it informs you collectively and as individuals. It was a very deliberate decision for Human to be based in a building with a sense of history and not a generic office block.
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B: What is your favourite piece of your own work and why is it your favourite?
NB: Designers often say "the next one" and that can sound cheesy but, regardless of how long you've been working, if you don't believe in what you're doing now you should do something else.
A few months ago we collaborated with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Sheffield on a project called COMPUTER LOVE - an online 3D gallery with exhibits examining the relationship between humans and computers. I came up with the concept, curated the exhibition and designed the gallery with Dan here at Human. It gave me an opportunity to work with artists I respect and really push how their ideas are communicated. Even after 22 years, I can't think of anything better I've worked on or been more proud of.
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B: Three words that sum up you and your attitude to what you do?
NB: Family. Art. Human.
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B: Describe your style?
NB: Like many British men my age, I'm a Sci-Fi junkie, so I guess there's always some element of "the future" in anything I work on - that's what interests me.
In my role as creative director of Human I've realised my "style" goes beyond the aesthetic. It's a way of doing things; how you treat people, being ambitious and yet content in life, showing respect and listening to others, pushing technology and examining what it actually means to be a designer in 2012.
It's far more interesting now to see my ideas and thoughts translated via the clever, talented, people around me :D
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B: What kind of music do you listen to?
NB: Anything that involves robots. Or lots of loud guitars and no words.
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B: What is your most played track in iTunes?
NB: 'Two Tribes' by Frankie Goes To Hollywood. My favourite single of all time, delivered at the dawn of remix culture. I have a playlist containing 22 different mixes, which lasts for 2 blissful hours.
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B: What is your favourite piece of art?
NB: I've not found it yet, but James Turrell's Deer Shelter Skyspace at Yorkshire Sculpture Park comes pretty close, as does the work of Jeremy Moon and Kenneth Martin.
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B: Where were you last happiest?
NB: On a Friday night a few weeks ago. The whole team went out in the Shalesmoor Triangle with various partners and friends to celebrate Human's 5th birthday, Dan's 29th birthday and the 1st week of our new designer, Michaela.
It means a lot to see 15 people happy at the same time in the same place and know that you've played a big part in making that happen. It also means a lot to be able to walk into the 7 Spices and say "30 popadoms please".
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B: What makes you smile?
NB: Thinking about what I just typed.
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B: Your house is on fire, your family is safe, what do you save?
NB: Nothing. Everything else that's important is in my head or online. The rest is just stuff.

Thanks Nick!

Note(s)/Link(s)
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Website: http://www.humanstudio.com / The Designers Republic / The Rutland / Candytown / Sheffield / Maltby / Mainartery / University of Sheffield / 'Two Tribes' / Frankie Goes To Hollywood / James Turrell's Deer Shelter Skyspace / Yorkshire Sculpture Park / 7 Spices.

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